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Harare Lawyer Challenges Mandatory Vaccination

20 August 2021

A Harare-based lawyer has opposed the government’s recent decision of making vaccination mandatory for church and religious gatherings as well as the move by other companies and governments of sending unvaccinated staff on leave.

In his court challenge, Obert Kondongwe said currently there is no law in Zimbabwe that makes vaccination mandatory.


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He argued that as such, churches should not be penalised for allowing unvaccinated congregants to attend church gatherings. Said Kondongwe:

It is trite that each person, having fully considered the implications and effects of vaccination, is expected to make a personal decision on whether or not to get vaccinated and even to make a personal decision regarding the timing of such vaccination.

... For the Government or an employer to impose vaccination as a condition for the continuation of the church or employment is not only to invade the dignity of the person affected but to also attack it irreparably.

It has also become apparent that both vaccinated and unvaccinated people transmit the virus and as such, there is no point in excluding unvaccinated congregants/employees from churches/ workplaces if both can transmit.

... Informed consent violations especially against the poor and uneducated, unconstitutional attempts to make vaccines mandatory by Government and Businesses, serious adverse effects of the vaccine including deaths, infertility and bodily harm, prevention and treatment medicines such as Ivermectin are being blocked and Information from an ex-Pfizer employee Whistle-blower that vaccines contain graphene oxide which is toxic to humans.

Kondongwe’s arguments are based on section 60 of the constitution of Zimbabwe that every person has the right to freedom of conscience, which includes the right to freedom of thought, religion or belief.

The right also includes the freedom to practise and propagate and give expression to their thought, opinion, religion or belief, whether in public or in private and whether alone or together with others.

More: HealthTimes

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